Draft Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders (IGAP)

Joint ILAE and IBE cascade target regarding the draft Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders: 
-90% of all people with epilepsy aware of their diagnosis as a treatable brain disorder
-80% of people diagnosed with epilepsy with access to appropriate, affordable, safe antiseizure medicines
-70% of people with epilepsy on treatment achieve adequate seizure control

ILAE and IBE are jointly advocating for a cascade target for epilepsy to be included in the Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders to inspire a decade of action and achieve meaningful improvements in care and treatment for all of the 50 million plus people who live with epilepsy globally.

We need broad support!

Please write to WHO at brainhealth@who.int to advocate for Epilepsy 90-80-70.

As many as 70% of people with epilepsy coul dlive seizure free if they had access to appropraite medicine. Most do not. Making anti-seizure medication more available and affordable would allow more people to get the treatment they deserve.
Birth-related injury, nervous system infection, stroke, and traumatic brain injury account for nearly 1 in 4 cases of epilepsy worldwide. Strategies to prevent these injuries and infections can dramatically reduce the number of people developing epilepsy.
Epilepsy is not contagious. You cannot “catch” epilepsy by being near someone who is having a seizure. Educating people about this and other myths can help improve the lives of people with epilepsy.
The stigma of having epilepsy can prevent children from attending school and adults from finding jobs. Stigma also affects relationships and friendships. Educating communities about epilepsy can reduce this stigma and improve quality of life.
In some countries, people believe epilepsy is due to a curse or demonic possession. If they understand epilepsy is a medical condition that can be treated, they may be more likely to seek healthcare.
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People with epilepsy have a risk of premature death up to three times higher than the general population. This risk is even higher in low- and middle-income countries, as well as in rural areas.
Many people with epilepsy are treated by non-specialists who may have little to no training in epilepsy. Education programs for these health providers can improve diagnosis and treatment.
Teachers who understand epilepsy can be a positive influence. Students with epilepsy can experience social isolation and may be restricted from playing sports or participating in other activities.
Globally, about 5 million people are diagnosed with epilepsy each year – about the same number of people as the entire population of Sydney, Australia.

 

A History of Initiatives to Reduce the Global Burden of Epilepsy

Click the image below to view the full-size infographic with interactive links.

WHO History of initiatives to reduce the global burden of epilepsy infographic
A History of Initiatives to Reduce the Global Burden of Epilepsy PDF

First draft of the IGAP

Click the image below to read the draft Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders, June 2021.

First draft of the Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders (IGAP), June 2021. Click to read PDF.
First draft of the IGAP PDF

ILAE/IBE Virtual Roundtable

Click the image below to read the report on the virtual roundtable held by ILAE and IBE, 16 July 2021.

Report on the virtual roundtable discussion held by ILAE and IBE,16 July 2021. Click to read PDF.
Report on the virtual roundtable discussion PDF

Epilepsy 90-80-70: A SMART Target

Click the image below to read how the proposed cascade target is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time bound.

Epilepsy 90-80-70: A SMART Target. Click to read PDF.
Epilepsy 90-80-70: A SMART Target PDF

Joint ILAE/IBE IGAP recommendations

Click the image below to read the ILAE and IBE letter to WHO, 28 July 2021.

Joint ILAE/IBE letter to WHO with IGAP recommendations click to read
Joint ILAE/IBE IGAP recommendations PDF

ILAE, ICNA & WFN IGAP recommendations

Click the image below to read the letter to the WHO from ILAE, the International Child Neurology Association and the World Federation of Neurology, 12 August 2021.

Letter to the World Health Organization from ILAE, the International Child Neurology Association and the World Federation of Neurology with three key recommendations to reflect in the Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders (IGAP), 12 August 2021. Click to read PDF.
ILAE, ICNA & WFN IGAP recommendations PDF

ILAE review of IGAP comments

Click the image below to read the letter written by J Helen Cross on behalf of ILAE to the WHO, 13 October 2021.

Letter to the World Health Organization from Prof J Helen Cross on behalf of ILAE reacting to the document circulated with comments on the draft Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders (IGAP), 13 October 2021. Click to read PDF.
ILAE review of IGAP comments PDF

For more information on IGAP, visit the WHO website.

What will it take to make Epilepsy 90-80-70 a reality?

90% of all people with epilepsy aware of their diagnosis as a treatable brain disorder

  • Increased public and professional awareness about epilepsy
  • Improved diagnosis through training and enhanced specialist networks
  • Harmful myths replaced with an understanding that epilepsy is a treatable brain disorder

80% of people diagnosed with epilepsy with access to appropriate, affordable, safe antiseizure medicines

  • Strengthened, sustainable essential medicine supply chains
  • Proper financing and pricing to ensure that anti-seizure medicines are affordable
  • Reclassification of certain anti-seizure medicines to allow production and importation

70% of people with epilepsy on treatment achieve adequate seizure control

  • Investment in primary and community care and support
  • People with epilepsy informed, engaged and empowered
  • Continued research to improve treatment options

Is it feasible? Could we achieve these targets?

Yes, it is feasible. There is a strong evidence base to support all of the areas listed above. It is possible to detect, diagnose and treat epilepsy through a primary health care approach.

Yes, we could achieve these targets by 2031. With strong government commitment, investment, greater inclusion and understanding, all three targets could be achieved within a decade.

Express your support for this target by emailing WHO at brainhealth@who.int.